Symmetry and Tessellation in Nature (by Erik Willison)

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#exploremaths
In this lesson we found that symmetry comes in 4 different kinds, these are: -rotational, 

        -reflectional, 

        -translational,

        -scale symmetry.

I found it funny that even though everyone has seen many examples of these four types of symmetry, most people could only come up with two or three types of symmetry. But despite that we aren’t very observant at times, all symmetry is beautiful as we discussed in class and we proved that by creating some of our own symmetry. We made a random shape, reflected it and then enlarged it and in doing so made both reflectional and scale symmetry. We also made a really cool spirally square thingy that is full of maths; it has scale and rotational symmetry, it has the golden spiral in an infinite amount of places plus it looks pretty cool.

And that was  basically the end of the lesson except we looked at some hexagons and had tessellation briefly mentioned to us, so here i have some examples of symmetry in nature. The most obvious example of this would have to be a beehive but I thought that saying beehive and pineapple was a cop out so I came up with a list of not common tessellating things in nature:)

-cracks in the ground on a dry day

-Any reptiles skin

-Each segment on a leaf no matter how small

-The pupil and iris of our eyes

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